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organic law. and saying that the constitution could not possibly have anticipated our every governing question. i invite you to imagine if you will, just close your eyes and just imagine the right wing outcry. if president obama called the constitution organic law. instead of saying this. liberals have always understood that, they understood it when president lincoln said it and when president obama said it. but conservatives have never, ever understood that when times change, so must we. and the day conservatives actually do understand that, they will no longer be conservatives. >>> obama land. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. yesterday we discovered the obama doctrine. put simply, it's to continue the american revolution well into the 21st century. defined economic equality for women, full equality all out for gay people. and full political and financial opportunity for people of color. everything about yesterday screamed with this manifesto from the makeup of the crowd to the people in the inaugural platf
anyone else under the law, for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. >> there's grievance there, not just rights. people waiting in line. i said this before, i was lucky to be there when south africans first got the vote, all south africans, and they waited for four or five hours, and i thought that was unbelievable. and then to watch people in america, in this advanced society of democracy, having to wait eight hours. it looked like a punitive action by republicans, to be blunt about it, from state legislatures and big capital cities that decided, you know what? let's make it hard for these people. maybe we can cut down that vote. >> that's one of those great underr
in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no criminal records who want to die. these are adult facts that don't intrude on the childish world of white house policy making. he notes adam lanza in newtown, his own mother of course passed a background check. >> here's the bottom line. these laws are not perfect. and you'll always find certain exceptions. but they make a huge difference. every major person who has studied the brady law, which is the most significant gun safety law we've passed in the last 20 years has said it has reduced gun violence dramatically. law e
hundreds of ordinances and state laws. most of which were unconstitutional. and he didn't know what to do. johnson dearly did not want to send troops, united states army troops, into alabama. his fear was that this would precipitate really a second period of reconstruction. just as the marchers were getting ready to head out in defiance of a court or order, wh hundreds of deputies and troopers waiting for them. fruition came to a very subtle problematic plan that johnson had been working on all night, and king had been listening to all night. johnson said, former -- johnson sent former governor, rely collins, who had taken the job to run the federal con sillation service, on a plane at 2:00 in the morning. he was picked up by assistant attorney general john dore, and was driven to the place where king was staying. king came out of the bedroom wearing a robe and two officials gave him a plan. and lyndon johnson had participated in thinking it up. they said, reverend king, we not only have been talking to you, we've been talking to governor wallace, and he doesn't want anymore bloodshed, an
we ask of each citizen is to respect the law, and i think that you and the rest must take care and must beware of that. another issue, it's about syria -- >> no, let's talk about the women's issue, because it's an important one. this is not, first of all, nobody in the west is trying to get women to take their veils off. the issue as described in the arab development report written by an arab woman is that there are three great deficits in the arab world x the third one -- and the third one is the rights of women. this is written by an arab about the arab world with enormous amounts of data. by any comparison with the rest of the world, the status of women in the arab world is poor. so, you know, i think part of solving the problem and dealing with it is to acknowledge that it exists. my own humble suggestion would be that you can make this into an anti-western crusade, but the truth of the matter is the women in the arab world deserve better. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: but i have not, i have not blamed the west. i have not blamed the west, and i don'
proportions in this country. the laws which govern abortion are broken an estimated 1 million times a year, 3,000 times a day, for various medical, social, and economic reasons the laws do not recognize as valid. the conflict between the law and reality has resulted in a national dilemma. only recently have our abortion laws been openly questioned, has a dialogue begun among doctors, lawyers, and clergymen. >> the law's against you, your colleagues are against you, and it makes a very unhappy feeling. you hate to be a doctor under these conditions. this is simply puritanical punishment, that's all we're doing. we're not thinking this thing through. we're punishing. >> an abortion is a shock, it's an abnormal procedure. in my opinion, it's murder. in my opinion, it is a very cowardly form of murder because it's the murder of an innocent little embryo that has not harmed anyone, that cannot defend itself in any way. >> i believe i'm about nine weeks pregnant now. i have had dreams for the past two weeks about abortions, of horrible things happening to me. i can't sleep, and i need help from som
, their transfer. we are different from the new york state law. we do not require registration of grandfathered weapons. and in that regard we are also different from the california law. in a sense it's a little more moderate in that regard because the gun organizations regard registration as "the first step to confiscation." >> schieffer: when somebody sells one of these guns they may have now or gives it to someone else? >> we rerequire a full background check to the transferee the person to whom the gun is transferred. >> schieffer: do you think the n.r.a. is now or less powerful than 20 years ago? >> i think they're equally as powerful. they're now supported by a lot of gun manufacturers. they've certainly extended their arm-- this morning's front page story in the "new york times" tells about their efforts to provide training and weapons to youngsters 8-15 years old. as a matter of fact, i saw a very young youngster with an ar-15 in the newspaper this morning. that's the same type weapon that was usedly at sandy hook school. i know what happened to the bodies at sandy hook school, and to h
has studied the brady law, which is the most significant gun safety law we've passed in the last 20 years has said it has reduced gun violence dramatically. law enforcement is totally for the brady law. and the idea that felons or people who are mentally infirm or people who are spousal abusers should be allowed to buy guns, most everyone agrees on that, even -- >> but there's no overwhelming evidence of the assault weapons ban dramatically reduced this incident of violence, nor was there an uptick in this sort of violence once the law lapsed. >> during the 10 years that the assault weapons ban was in effect, the use of those weapons in crime went down a significant percent an. >> senator, is there any gun regulation, any restriction of gun rights, you could accept or vote for? >> sure. i think the fact that we have background checks with people buy firearms and we prevent felons and those with serious mental illness acquiring them, those make perfect sense. >> so a background check is something you could support? >> well, the background checks are in place when a licensed firearms
now set to announce a framework that could bring sweeping changes in our immigration laws and this would be historic. we'll see if they get it done though. hope the weekend was fantastic. >> it was. how about yours? bill: decent. martha: happy monday, good morning, everybody. i'm martha maccallum. the details of this bill need to be worked out. the senators want to cover four main goals in this. it includes something you heard a lot about, a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants already living here. and the establishment of a employment verification program to prevent employers from hiring illegal immigrants. something like that already exists. they want to do changes to that. also an agricultural worker program in this country. bill: steve centanni, leads our coverage. he is live in washington. what happens exactly today, steve? good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning, bill. a bipartisan group of eight senators will unveil its new immigration proposal here on capitol hill. it is a plan as you said that lays out a path to citizenship for 11 million undocu
to be an honest review of possible changes in the law that would be based on hard data, not just the political agenda of one side. well, so much for that. as many of us feared, there will be no executive orders or proposed legislation that might rile the president's hollywood pals. none of the legislation proposed so far is really about comprehensive mental health care reform. it's all about firing up the same old plans from the left, to pass new laws that will limit the freedoms of citizens who haven't broken any laws. emotional rational has been, as the president said this week, if there's even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there's even one life that can be saved, then we've got an obligation to try it. >> well, we all want to save lives, don't we? so, here is something hopefully that the president can agree to. since he says he wants to save the lives of children, we can start by ending the national nightmare of the destruction of more than a milunborn children a year, who didn't die at the end of a madman's gun, but at the end of abortionists scalpel and scraper. it's bee
. and it was also going to be an honest review of possible changes in the law that would be based on hard data, not just the political agenda of one side. well, so much for that. as many of us feared, there will be no executive orders or proposed legislation that might rile the president's hollywood pals. none of the legislation proposed so far is really about comprehensive mental health care reform. it's all about firing up the same old plans from the left, to pass new laws that will limit the freedoms of citizens who haven't broken any laws. emotional rational has been, as the president said this week, if there's even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there's even one life that can be saved, then we've got an obligation to try it. >> well, we all want to save lives, don't we? so, here is something hopefully that the president can agree to. since he says he wants to save the lives of children, we can start by ending the national nightmare of the destruction of more than a million unborn children a year, who didn't die at the end of a madman's gun, but at the end of abortionists
, not revolution. and the only way you can do that is through the rule of law. so, national committee was put together. and they changed a third of the constitution and created independent commission for elections and a new constitut n constitutional court and many other laws. so, we took the systematic approach mainly because of my experiences being educated in the west and looking at how western systems did it it was the rule of law. i was surprised by western think tanks and the european ambassadors in our country where they say that is very difficult. you think? i mean, this has been a major challenge and you can't have this by waving a magic wand. it will take hard work so that people start to, for the next elections, vote for candidates because they're on left to right of these particular issues. so, that political party culture, that is the major challenge. and where we're starting from low down in jordan, we're still steps ahead of many countries in the middle east. so, it's going to be tough for all of us. but that's the only way that i think we can do it. >> your majesty, thank you
is of course fighting back, saying in a statement senator feinstein has been trying to ban guns from law abiding citizens for decades. they know gun bans don't work and we are confident congress will reject senator feinstein's wrong-headed approach. >> joining me, carolyn, who is pushing a similar bill in the house, and also philadelphia mayor michael nutter. welcome to you both. when i heard dianne feinstein today, very personal,vy emotional, reliving one of the horrific things she went through, as indeed you did. here's what i don't get. i don't get why within minutes, really, of this assault weapons ban being proposed, already we start to hear, it may be impossible to get it through the senate, through the house. and the main reason may be democrats. democrats who are too worried about their own spins and their own backyards and their own political careers to do what they probably believe would be the right thing for their country. what do you do to change their minds and therefore the chances of success of this attempt to change the law? >> well, piers, what you have to understand, a
of the governor and the mayor. big corporate donors, big business owners. they are so many laws -- there are so many laws. they treat you like slaves. host: how is the issue of immigration factoring into what is happening in texas? if we expect the president to make remarks on immigration in las vegas this week. caller: it falls back on the standard of living. it does not matter if you are an immigrant or not. if you are a person that is living in the country that does not provide the wealth to keep your family strong, and at the same time enough money that the government -- every week. host: thank you for your call. the highest salary is $179,000. the lowest is in maine for $70,000. the average governor salary is $130,000. billy is up next in florida on the independent line. caller: hello. i was watching the local news the other day in florida. they had gov. scott in tallahassee saying they had not see an -- they had not seen any money for the medicare program. >> what did you make of that? caller: i think they are in trouble. i am 75 years old and i have lost my medicare coverage. host: are y
.com. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> this has always been an uphill fight. this has never been easy. this is the hardest of the hard. >> california senator dianne feinstein acknowledging her bill banning assault weapons faces an uphill challenge. joining me is democratic senator richard blumenthal. it is good to see you. thanks for being here. >> thank you, kraig. >> you just heard what senator feinstein said. what reforms do you think we can see enacted? >> an assault weapon ban and a prohibition on high clip capacities is doable. >> you think it is doable? >> i think it is. more likely background checks for all firearms purchases. right now 40% of them involve no background checks. convicted felon, fugitive, drug addict can walk into a store and buy a shopping cart full of ammunition and pay for it no q
, as well. >> let's talk about gun laws because i know they're considering gun laws in texas that would allow swron to carry a concealed weapon on a campus. they can't do that now, right? >> reporter: it's interesting. the texas legislators have gone through this debate several times. many years ago they passed a conceal handgun law where you can hear a handgun and that's what was used in this incident. but there are places where even despite having that license you you can't carry a handgun. churches and school campuses are one of those. ironically enough, there are lawmakers in austin that want to change that aspect of the concealed handgun law here in texas and allow students to carry guns on to campus. so we'll see how this plays out in that debate, as well. >> all right. ed lavendera, thanks so much. >>> investigators say the new mexico teenager accused of murdering members of his family had hoped to go on a killing spree and die in a shoot-out with police. the 15-year-old was arrested saturday night after deputies found the bodies of his mother, father, brother and two of his sist
the policy barring women in the military from combat units. but another priority, strength ling gun laws, will be much harder. >> these weapons do not belong on the street of our towns, our cities, in our schools, in our malls, in our workplaces, in our movie theaters. enough is enough. >> schieffer: almost 20 years ago, california democrat dianne feinstein pushed an vault weapons ban through congress. can she do it again, and is it the answer? she's with us this morning along with new york city's top cop ray kelly. as president begins his second term, republicans are rethinking who they are and where they go here. >> we can't get rattled. we won't play the villain in his morality plays. we have to stay united. >> schieffer: we'll hear more on that from newt gingrich. tennessee republican representative, marsha blackburn. for analysis, being bring there david ignatius of the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and from campaign 2012, obama adviser stephanie cutter, and romney adviser kevin madden. back to face off one more time because this is "face the nation." capt
and uphold our values through strength of arms and rule of law. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. america will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe. and weapon will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crisis abroad. for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world. >> i think that's the most important thing he said today because i think it's about war and peace. i think he wants peace with iran, somehow. and i think picking hagel and john kerry are part of that today. it will be interesting to look at the traffic tomorrow out of teheran and whether they respond to this or not. the president said it was time now for his generation to keep up the work on behalf of all americans and immigrants. this is very liberal. let's listen. >> authority is not complete until our wives, our mothers and daughters are can earn a living equal to our efforts. our journey is not compl
of violence once the law lapsed. >> during the 10 years that the assault weapons ban was in effect, the use of those weapons in crime went down a significant percent an. >> senator, is there any gun regulation, any restriction of gun rights, you could accept or vote for? >> sure. i think the fact that we have background checks with people buy firearms and we prevent felons and those with serious mental illness acquiring them, those make perfect sense. >> so a background check is something you could support? >> well, the background checks are in place when a licensed firearms dealer sells firearms. and there's a lot of room for improvement -- >> but 45% of sales are citizen to citizen. that's the loophole we talk about. >> that statistic is pretty bogus. it's based on a study before the background checks were put into place. so that study is highly questionable, that 45%. >> wayne lapierre never questioned that study when i brought up that point. he questioned feasibility and collecting records, but still there is a loophole that a lot of people would like to correct. >> there actually isn't
of congress, fogs, members of the executive branch the bodyguard of the people who make our laws. the bottom line, the people who are banning ordinary americans from owning these weapons will be protected by people carrying the weapons. >> a weird double standard and specifically this legislation would do this, let's put out exactly what it would do, and we have that here. so this is the-- it would prohibit the sale, manufacture and transporttation of 157 more commonly-- it would have the magazine owes of ten rounds. >> that's something-- >> we saw similar to that in new york state the passing that andrew cuomo just passed, seven rounds and police are upset about that and they're having to remove three rounds of the chambers of their magazines so that they don't violate the very law. >> well, in new york state there was an apartmently an oversight in writing the law that did not exempt law enforcement from it and that's going to be changed. bottom line we've been told repeatedly by the vice-president and many others in the administration, you don't need these weapons to defend yourself. a sh
. >> there seem to be a pretty broad discussion, he wanted to make sure that those who under the law are able to be constitutionally denied access to a weapon, like somebody who is adjudicated, not cable bill because of the mental capacity and or a convicted felon, and or somebody who has been guilty of domestic violence under the law, they are not allowed to own a weapon. they are able to be denied ownership of a weapon. one of the problems pointed out was there was an adjudication of the gunmen who committed the crime at the virginia tech. he was able to go out and purchase two weapons about one month apart. we talked about the nation of the universal background checks. we talked about making sure that state equipped the system that washington has on prohibitive persons on file. so if you go to a gun dealer or dick's sporting goods to buy a weapon, use what your card or this what it and find out if you are part of the prohibited class of people. we talked a lot about that. we also talked a great deal because we have three people, one psychiatrist and two others who have been a great deal of
and following the rule of law and as more evidence becomes available, they are prepared to act on him again. i think as hillary clinton said dramatically, our focus here now is to bring these guys to justice but also to understand benghazi in the context of what's happening over the last few days to understand the evolving threat from al qaeda and to deal appropriately with that. >> dana loesch there were phone calls today that they would have been fired. do you agree with that? >> there were a lot of missteps here. we do know that you had said that there was a whisper of questioning susan rice and secretary of state clinton. i don't think asking questions on why talking points were changed, we know for sure the u.s. intelligence report came out and said extremists that led the attack had al qaeda ties. why was that removed? who removed it? who was in charge of manipulating these talking points. these are questions i wish would have been asked today. >> okay. that's fine. if you're going to take the argument that anyone guilty of misreading intelligence and so on should actually be fired, wher
-- was funded by american groups. and the law forbidding the adoption of russian children, a huge part of it was the homosexual lobby. russia was a communist nation, atheist, and these people take god serious now in these countries. host: richard, thanks for the call and thanks for adding your voice and perspective to the conversation. kevin cathcart. guest: i hardly know where to start, but first of all, there are gay people in every country in the world, and the movement for lgbt civil rights around the world are home run in these countries. they are not steered by america and american money into it is true that there are many countries where the clashes between pro- and anti-gay politics are stronger than it is in the united states today. there are also countries in the world that are ahead of the united states, places where there is merit recognition and national civil rights laws, things we are still working towards and trimming of in this country. i don't think you can say that the united states is better than everywhere else. you certainly cannot say that the united states is wo
to be sitting right there waiting for when they open up. >> reporter: thousands of law enforcement officers and federal troops from around country will be on hand to make sure everyone is safe. today's swearing in on the steps of the u.s. capitol is ceremonial, held for the public. the constitution requires that the official swearing in take place on january 20th. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> reporter: he followed that up with a candlelight ceremony sunday night where he said today's parties are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. c
for life, calling for new laws to outlaw abortion. one of the most powerful anti-abortion voices is the catholic church which firmly believes life begins at conception. one catholic hospital in colorado finds itself on the opposite side of this debate. it's an amazing story. "outfront" with this investigation. >> there wasn't one person that went into that er, there were three. >> reporter: jeremy's wife laurie, seven months pregnant with his twin boys. it was new year's day 2006. laurie was vomiting and couldn't breathe. he rushed her to st. thomas hospital in canyon city, colorado. >> laurie looked and up her head went down on her chest. >> reporter: in the lobby of the emergency room she went into full cardiac arrest from a pulmonary embolism. laurie stodgehill, 31 years old, died. and who did her 28 week along unborn twins. >> i didn't even get to hold them. i have an autopsy picture. that's all i've got. >> reporter: stodgehill sued the hospital and its owner, catholic health initiatives, which operates nearly 80 hospitals in 14 states. he filed the wrongful death suit on be
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)